The World is Full of Good News too

Turning on the nightly news, whether it be local or global, is bound to be an exercise in depressing futility. Whether it is a twelve car pileup, the local restaurant who failed its health exam, a case of road rage, a corrupt politician caught with his hands in the proverbial pot, despair and protest over Trumps’ latest tweet, acts of terrorism, or perhaps even the more provincial annual outrage over the grinch who stole Christmas by taking the yard inflatable Santa and his reindeer out of someone’s yard. For sure, the element of the depravity of mankind is ever with us, but that should not stop us from celebrating and recognizing that the times we live in are better than ever on a tremendous amount of fronts.

Take for instance the “Notable and Quotable” section out of today’s Wall Street Journal, in which Johan Norberg points out that since 1990, actual poverty, defined as living on $1.9 per day or less and adjusted for inflation and local purchasing power parity, has fallen from 37 percent of the world population to less than 10 percent today. That’s a rate of 138,000 people escaping poverty every day.

In a more fulsome article on the subject within The Spectator back in August of 2016, Norberg elaborates on the points of the golden age we live in and the reasons for people’s doom and gloom pessimism.

If you think that there has never been a better time to be alive — that humanity has never been safer, healthier, more prosperous or less unequal — then you’re in the minority. But that is what the evidence incontrovertibly shows. Poverty, malnutrition, illiteracy, child labour and infant mortality are falling faster than at any other time in human history. The risk of being caught up in a war, subjected to a dictatorship or of dying in a natural disaster is smaller than ever. The golden age is now…

…Look at 1828, when The Spectator was first published. Most people in Britain then lived in what is now regarded as extreme poverty. Life was nasty (people still threw their waste out of the window), brutish (corpses were still displayed on gibbets) and short (30 years on average). But even then things had been improving. The first iteration of The Spectator, in 1711, was published in a Britain whose people subsisted on average on fewer calories than the average child gets today in sub-Saharan Africa.

Karl Marx thought that capitalism inevitably made the rich richer and the poor poorer. By the time Marx died, however, the average Englishman was three times richer than at the time of his birth 65 years earlier — never before had the population experienced anything like it.

Fast forward to 1981. Then, almost nine in ten Chinese lived in extreme poverty; now just one in ten do. Then, just half of the world’s population had access to safe water. Now, 91 per cent do. On average, that means that 285,000 more people have gained access to safe water every day for the past 25 years.

But what about the plights facing the world of today? Norberg’s advice is sound:

Times have been rough since the financial crisis, yet for all the talk of Americans ‘left behind by globalisation’, median income for low- and middle-income US households has increased by more than 30 per cent since 1970. And this excludes all the things you can’t put a price on, such as advances in medicine, an extra ten years of life expectancy, the internet, mass entertainment, and cleaner air and water…

…Parts of the world are falling to pieces but fewer parts than before. Conflicts always make the headlines, so we assume that our age is plagued by violence. We obsess over new or ongoing fights, such as the horrifying civil war in Syria — but we forget the conflicts that have ended in countries such as Colombia, Sri Lanka, Angola and Chad. We remember recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, which have killed around 650,000. But we struggle to recall that two million died in conflicts in those countries in the 1980s. The jihadi terrorist threat is new and frightening — but Islamists kill comparatively few. Europeans run a 30 times bigger risk of being killed by a ‘normal’ murderer — and the European murder rate has halved in just two decades.

But inequality is growing faster than ever, you might retort. I am going to refute much of notions of how many studies focus on inequality and why they are flawed in a post later on this week, but for now I will point back to an earlier post as to why this is the wrong focus. Also, just as a gentle reminder – the politics of envy and the urge to give government power to address it is beset with problems. Namely, envy of a neighbor who has a mansion is just that, a base and unvirtuous feeling. He can do nothing further to me than invoke feelings and emotions. In contrast, the government leveler with the monopoly of violence can do far more harm.

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