Government – the only sphere on earth where abject failure leads to more power and responsibility

It is a curious and novel tendency that government failures don’t lead to accountability and a search for knowledge and truth, but rather inexorable demands for yet more powers. Witness the increasing calls for the public option in healthcare insurance. Are we really going to trust the powers who gave us the VA and the monumental failures of Obamacare with even more arbitrary and market upending powers that will be impossible to claw back? This is a remarkable centrifugal force unique to government. Try getting away with this in the private sector and see how long it lasts.

The problem isn’t the scapegoated free market (that has not actually existed in healthcare for decades) or insurance companies when we witness rising premiums, the failure of insurance exchanges, and the decades-long march of healthcare costs rising faster than the rate of inflation. Although one can’t help but engage in just a tiny bit of schadenfreude at insurance companies groaning under the weight of their own Faustian bargains with the government in support of the Affordable Care Act (the tradeoff being forced and locked in customers in exchange for standardized coverage plans coverage of pre-existing conditions, and an overall environment of cross-subsidization of low-risk policyholders to higher risk ones). Too bad that there are real lives at stake and 20% of our economy continuing its long rapid descent into a massive government intervention – making this no small laughing matter.

The problem is the unintended (and often intended, as is the case of the mergers of health systems and the demise of the private physician practice) consequences of strangulating regulations and inept government policies foisted on the market by the tyranny of experts who are too arrogant to perceive that no individual or collection of elite individuals could ever effectively replace the collective and mysterious emergent order of free individuals making free choices. This aforementioned comedy of errors was entirely predictable, at least among those not within tenured positions within CMS and HHS and the rent-seekers that lobby them for rules that further entrench their monopolies (ahem, large insurers and large health systems).

Speaking of the tyranny of experts, I can’t help but view them as analogous to the competing architects in a Monty Python sketch in which one accidentally designs a slaughterhouse and one designs something that does exactly the opposite of what he says it will do – still somehow winning the contract. For the time-strapped for comedy, the best analogy occurs starting at the 3:15 mark.

 

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The left’s massive remake of healthcare strikes and fails again

Bagdad Bob.jpg

In a recent Modern Healthcare article, it is evident that small health plans and insurers are being heavily penalized by the ACA’s risk corridor program in a shocking, but not entirely unpredictable, bit of reverse corporate wealth redistribution in which money is actually flowing from small businesses and insurers to the behemoths in the industry such as Anthem and Aetna. Since the ACA and ancillary modern healthcare legislation seems to be openly promoting and favoring the large health system and large insurer over the small private practice and small insurer, this really should not be a surprise. Perhaps it is bringing scarcely disguised huzzahs from those in progressive camps .

Meantime, officials at CMS, in true Baghdad Bob soothsaying fashion, continue to maintain that everything is working to plan. If by working according to plan they mean standing ready to cover and excuse their errors while promising to correct their original mistakes with more thousand page complex and inscrutable reforms (in other words, the standard government playbook of creating a problem through market intervention, blaming venal companies, and then creating more market intervention to further compound the original errors), then I guess they are correct. Meantime, there is less care plan choice due to mandated standardization, less consumer choice of  health providers and insurance companies due to industry consolidation, and precipitously increasing premiums. The next step from progressives is inevitable – proposals that only a single payer health system can resolve this government induced mess. The question to free citizens is, do you really trust the government that can’t build a bridge to manage the entirety of your health insurance system?